Tuesday, February 5, 2019

Creating Treasure


I love it when something changes my perspective on a certain topic. 

Looking at things from a different point of view is a way to learn, grow, and change.

Recently, I had two separate events in my life that opened up my eyes about writing and publishing.

One was meeting a woman who wrote her memoir.

The other was expanding my "friends" on social media to include authors of nonfiction, poetry, kiddy lit, mysteries, thrillers, women's fiction, horror, literary fiction, and more.

After fifteen years of being totally immersed in genre fiction and the current indie publishing model--write fast, crank out a book every three months, follow trends, write to market, write a series, etc--it was refreshing to get a different point of view about the publishing world.

There are myriad approaches to writing and models for publishing.

Some folks write ONE book in their lifetime. 

ONE.

Just one.

Crazy?

I met a lovely woman at a book-signing who was selling her memoir. She was bubbling over with enthusiasm about her book. She'd scheduled talks at libraries, bookstores, and for groups that were appropriate for her topic.

When I asked what she was currently working on, she answered, "No other books. This is it for me. My story."

I was flabbergasted.

No other books?

She had written her story. It was her own personal literary treasure. 

It didn't lose value after three months. It didn't lose relevancy. She wasn't worried about cranking out a book every ninety days, and fretting that readers would forget about her.

Her book had a unique title and cover and story because it was her personal treasure.

It wasn't disposable. It was written to have long-term value. To be durable, special.

I also found that different corners of the publishing world had very different personalities and goals.

Some were focused on language, emotion. Their goals included being published in literary magazines and winning awards.

Some reached out to people with shared interests and concerns about the world around them.

Some were focused on bestseller lists and marketing plans.

I noticed a difference in the way the books were discussed and treated.

Some had longevity, timelessness. 

Some seemed generic, with similar covers, titles, and blurbs.

I discovered that I LOVE poets. They respect language. They respect each other. They're all about authenticity. 

I met people who promoted their books in a professional, non-aggressive way. And others who don't know that messaging a "new" friend with a spam promo is off-putting.

I came to this conclusion. There is room for everyone...

...The folks who focus on productivity and speed and commercial success.

...The folks who choose to create one treasure in their lifetime.

...Writers who concentrate on language and quality and recognition for that.

...People who teach and connect.

...And many more. An infinite number of possibilities.

Most importantly, any kind of book can have longevity and durability. 

Think about a favorite dog-eared cookbook.

Non-fiction, genre fiction, literary fiction.

Any kind of book can be timeless treasure with a long shelf-life.

That's a good goal for all writers, of all types. To create treasure for our readers.

Off to write,

Penny/Nina

4 comments:

Barbara Wallace said...

I approve of this message. Different strokes for different writers - the key is to find what makes you feel “right” on the inside.

Penny Watson said...

31 Flavors...Baskin Robbins! :^)

Tasha B. said...

Poets are pretty awesome :)

Penny Watson said...

Hi Tasha! Poets are the best. They are inspiring me daily!